The Family History of Ord House Country Park: A Timeline

Here at Ord House Country Park, we know that the history of our park plays a massive part in contributing to what we are today. Having a community is at the heart of who we are and that’s all thanks to our past. And, we bet there’s so much you don’t know about it! For example, did you know that we’ve had seven families live at Ord House Country Park before us? Yes, seven! The first family to ever live here was all the way back in 1789.

We wish we could share everything with you, but there’s simply waaay too much (we’d probably need to write a book… or two). Either way, let’s take a journey back in time and explore a little bit about who has lived here and how they have helped create the fascinating history that surrounds this park. 

1789: Admiral Godolphin Osborne

Disclaimer: he was in no way related to a dolphin.

Back in the 18th century, the village of Ord was to be a separate parish for civil purposes, where it got divided into East, Middle and West Ord. The East of the village turned into Ord House, built specifically for Admiral Godolphin Osborne way back in 1789. He is the whole reason Ord Country Park exists! His Manor House and grounds are now all part of Ord House, and became the home to all the families (and all the history) that follow! Interesting stuff.

1880: General John Tatton Brown Grieve 

Like Godolphin, this guy was also pretty incredible as he was known as the ‘father of the marines’ and served in the Peninsular War as part of the Royal Navy. He married twice and had three children who lived with him at Ord Manor House. Sweet! 

1888: Vice Admiral William Samuel Brown Grieve 

The son of General John Tatton Brown Grieve, and another officer in the Royal Navy! William was promoted to the Rank of Rear Admiral, and then again to the Rank of Vice Admiral. Because of his Naval duties, he and his wife lived at several different locations, but chose to settle at Ord Manor House in 1888.  

1896: Blanche Ruth Brooke Tatton Grieve 

Blanche was the eldest daughter of Vice Admiral William. She kept diaries where she wrote about her time at Ord Manor House, where one of the entries read ‘about to leave Ord Manor House, this is goodbye for sometime to come, now I must close my diary at Ord. Well goodbye dear little Ord’. How lovely! 

Blanche became the president of the Berwick Ladies LifeBoat Guild in 1923. She eventually became known as ‘the Queen Mother’ to the village due to all her charity work. And to be honest, we couldn’t think of a more deserving title!

Overall, the list of incredible people that lived here at Ord House Country Park is seriously long. They’re all pretty amazing people and they did some pretty amazing things too. Although we have to say… the latest family to live here really does beat them all, don’t you think?! Okay, we’re kidding…maybe. 

Come along and see Ord House for yourself – we promise there won’t be that many ghosts hanging around (just the odd few!) Who knows, maybe one day you’ll play a part in our history too! Get in touch with us here.

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